Araminta – I want to be like you.

“When I found I had crossed that line, I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person. There was such a glory over everything; the sun came like gold through the trees, and over the fields, and I felt like I was in Heaven.”
– Harriet Tubman
One of my favorite movies in the world stars Cicely Tyson as Harriet Tubman.
In this movie, she is humiliated almost beyond measure and it is that incident that spurs her on to running to her freedom.
In real life, it is the death of her owner and fear of more separation from family that sent her on her way.
She ran away with her two brothers who actually wanted to go back, so she escorted them back but still left and found herself in Pennsylvania.
We know her story, but I wonder how many of us know her first name?
It was Araminta. ❤
I think it is so beautiful.
Like her heart.
She changed her name to Harriet after her mother (Harriet) passed away.
 –
There is so much I could share about what she means to me as a strong woman.
She was married to a freed man who stayed in the south.
He actually chose to stay in the south when she preferred freedom, and he remained to marry another while she pursued her mission,
Her mission of making the trek back and forth – leading people away from hell on earth and into brand new way of life.
She served as a spy during the war!
She remarried – a war veteran.
She adopted a child.
(I have a soft place in my heart for adoptive parents.)
 –
But that isn’t what I desire to communicate today.
What I desire to communicate today is that Araminta, (Harriet) was one of the bravest women that ever lived to have left slavery –  only to risk her life over and over again to go back into the enemy’s territory and rescue others.
And then when the laws in the nation changed to allow slave owners to go into the north to get their slaves back, she made a way to take men and women all the way to Canada.
 –
CANADA.
On foot.
No Cars.
 –
We don’t go to Canada at all, and I live twenty short minutes from the bridge!
Of course, I am not a slave, either.
tubman
A rare carte-de-visite of Harriet Tubman, 1868-1869, jointly purchased by the Smithsonian National Museum of African American Culture and History (NMHAAC) and the Library of Congress, is considered the youngest image of Tubman we are aware of to date. (Photograph by Benjamin F. Powelson Collection of the National Museum of African American History and Culture shared with the Library of Congress, 2017.30.4)
What makes me sad, what breaks my heart, is to think of the slaves that told her no,
The people that told her no when she went back for them.
The people who were too afraid to risk it all, the loss of a way of life, the loss of life itself, even.
They allowed fear to entrap them in a lifestyle that robbed them of their very humanity.
 –
There is a lesson to be learned here.
I wonder if Kanye – who can be a weirdo sometimes – is learning the lesson of the slave that ran away to leave a way of life behind.
Any man or woman, really, who embraces the conservative values already in their heart, and leaves the democratic party,
who begins to feel the rejection from their brethren,
who hears the words, “sell out” or “Uncle Tom“…
 –
Leaving a way of life behind.
Risking death? No.
Losing a spouse? Or a spouse’s respect? Perhaps.

Losing family? Sometimes.

Is it worth it to be true to one’s self?
Always.

Araminta Tubman.
I want to be like her.
Marry a hero, like she did.
Adopt a child who needs a home, like she did.
But more importantly, show people where it is that they may be in bondage  –  not to condemn, and not to leave them there – but to show them the way out!
The way to deliverance.
The way to understanding of a different nature.
The way to freedom.
“When I found I had crossed that line, I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person. There was such a glory over everything; the sun came like gold through the trees, and over the fields, and I felt like I was in Heaven.” Araminta Harriet Tubman
just thoughts
-leah

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